Mark your calendar, Spring '20 Splash will be on March 8, 2020!


Splash Biography



REBECCA CZYRNIK, Marketing Analyst, but originaly studied Physics




Major: Not available.

College/Employer: UC Berkeley

Year of Graduation: Not available.

Picture of Rebecca Czyrnik

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I use Python, SQL, and R for my job, but I'm curious about how these programs work at the most basic level. How do electrons flow to allow me to type these words to you? How does "thought" come from atoms? How does a machine add 1+1?

These questions led me to build my own calculators from "scratch", and that brought me to the activity I have planned for you this spring.

If you're excited to start understanding what Really makes computers work, check out the 10,000 Domino Computer on YouTube from standupmaths. And then sign up for my class, Digital Logic and Circuit Building.

https://youtu.be/OpLU__bhu2w?t=139



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

E717: Digital Logic and Circuit Building in Splash Fall 2019 (Nov. 02, 2019)
Puzzle through circuit building challenges and learn how to breadboard at this introductory course. No math and no prerequisites, just hands-on learning.


E574: Digital Logic and Circuit Building in Splash Spring 19 (Mar. 16, 2019)
Puzzle through circuit building challenges and learn how to breadboard at this introductory course. No math and no prerequisites, just hands-on learning.


M331: Digital Logic and Circuit Building in Splash Spring 18 (Mar. 04, 2018)
Puzzle through circuit building challenges and learn how to breadboard at this introductory course. No math and no prerequisites, just hands-on learning.


M246: Breadboarding and Digital Logic in Splash Fall 17 (Nov. 04, 2017)
How does an electrical machine add numbers? We will spend the whole class trying to answer this one question. This is an activity-based puzzle-solving course with no prerequisites. We will learn how to use a breadboard to build circuits representing digital logic gates. Along the way, we may learn a bit about transistors and how to count in binary. And if we’re really lucky, we’ll even learn how a computer adds 1+1 = 2.