Splash Fall 2019
Course Catalog


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Arts Engineering
Humanities Math & Computer Science
Social Sciences Science
Miscellaneous


Arts

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A738: Knitting: a bag Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Xiaoyu Zhang

Teaching kids how to knit a bag!


Prerequisites
none

A751: Making art make sense: How to sound smart when talking about art.
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Brigitta Rehn

Da Vinci, Monet, Picasso, Pollack: if looking at art makes your head spin this class is for you. We will discuss the fundamentals of art history and the simple methods art historians use to explain works of art.
By the end of class you’ll have the tools to sound like a beret wearing, chin-stroking intellectual whenever you have to talk about art.

A676: Spanish Poetry 101
Difficulty: **

This class will focus on Soneto XXIII of the Spanish poet, Garcilaso de la Vega. This class will be taught in Spanish Language. We will be examinating the metric and the meaning of the poem by creating an open discussion.


Prerequisites
Spanish 3 or above

A674: Introduction to Tea Tasting Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Ian Castro

Tea is one of the most popular drinks in the world. Made from the leaves of Camellia sinensis, tea has a long history and is deeply embedded in various cultures. This class will introduce students to various types of tea, brewing styles, and the art of tea tasting for industry and production competitions. We will be tasting various teas from around the world, so come ready to drink!

A643: Learn to Sing!: Vocal Techniques and Harmony
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Amanda Yarnall

Ever contemplated taking voice lessons? Find out more about your voice and the techniques singers use to perfect their craft!
Participate in an interactive group vocal lesson--don't worry about shyness as we will all sing together--and learn how breathing, posture, tone, and diction, can enhance your voice.
Learn to sing harmonies with other beginners in the comfort of a group setting!
No previous vocal experience is required and singers of all skill levels are welcome.

A762: Dreamcatcher Making
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jenny Deng

Learn more about these beautiful cultural symbols while also having the chance to make your own!

A748: Slime Workshop Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Shuge Luo

Let’s make some slime!

Glitter
Lime
Rhyme

It’s play time.


Prerequisites
Enthusiasm

A633: Physical Comedy in Acting Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Marlene Guzman

This course will go through the basics of acting and physical comedy. In this class, you will learn how to do a comedic scene without the use of words. Along with learning how to convey emotions through the body and facial expressions.
(Wear comfortable clothing to move around in.)

A653: Introduction to Music Composition Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Steven Cen, Joshua Yang

Want to learn how to compose a catchy tune or two? This course will supply you with the basic tools needed to compose music! This course is for beginners, so no previous experience is necessary; however, experience with a musical instrument is highly encouraged, as this will make music composition easier to grasp.

On top of learning about composing, at the end of the class we will try to perform everyone's compositions. Feel free to bring your instruments!

Course content: Music chords and basic harmony, song structure, writing melodies, arranging, and notes on the creative process.


Prerequisites
Interest in composing, experience with a musical instrument (or voice). Familiarity with music notation is recommended but not required.

A659: Balloon Twisting
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Anna Perhach

Learn how to balloon twist. Be a clown.

A664: Mastering the Art of Modern Calligraphy
Difficulty: *

Are you guilty of watching endless calligraphy videos on Instagram? Ever wanted to try it for yourself but never had the tools for it? Guess what?! Join our class and learn that you can do calligraphy with any tools! From no.2 pencils to Crayola markers, learn how to enhance your learning with calligraphy!! In this course, you will learn the basic techniques of modern calligraphy. We will create fun cards and begin some of your journeys to bullet journaling. We will also show you an array of brands of effective markers you can use at a cheap cost. Overall, we're here to have a good time and share our artistic skills! Plus, you get to bring home souvenirs from our class!

A712: Artivism: Ways to Ignite Change Through Your Art
Difficulty: *

Two social scientists teach you how to use identity-based art as a tool for liberation, healing, activism, and community building.


Prerequisites
None! Just come with an open mind :~)

A761: Partner Dancing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ariel Hsieh

Learn the basics of partner dancing! We will touch upon the fundamentals of connection and learn the basic steps of a variety of partner dances.


Engineering

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E594: Build Your Own Balloon-Powered Cars and Hovercrafts!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brendan Tsuda

In this building-oriented lesson, we will introduce concepts of energy (specifically potential and kinetic energy), thrust, and friction. Students will then apply this knowledge and the engineering design process as they design and test their own balloon-powered cars and CD hovercrafts!

E657: Climate Change Mitigation
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: John Stuart

In a world where the effects of climate change are becoming more apparent by the day, the world is quickly realizing that something must be done to address them. However, many important questions remain largely ignored in the national conversation. How big is the problem? What can we do about it? And how much much must we do to solve it? This course will attempt to answer those questions.

This course will take a quantitative look at climate change and teach students to evaluate strategies for climate change mitigation. It will be broken into 3 parts.

1. Climate Science: Derive and evaluate the effect of greenhouse gasses on the climate.
2. Mitigation Technologies: Understand energy systems from production all the way to end use and calculate the impacts that changing technologies may have.
3. Adaptation and Geoengineering: Assess the merits of various engineering approaches to counteract the effects of climate change.

Inspired by the acclaimed UC Berkeley course created by Professor William Nazaroff, this course will aim to give students the tools they need to study, understand, and engineer solutions for a changing climate in a changing world.


Prerequisites
Algebra and chemistry required Calculus and physics recommended

E583: Design your own LED Greeting Card! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Caitlin Phan

This class is a mix of electronics and art!

We will review concepts about electricity to understand a simple circuit design. Then, there will be a demonstration of parallel circuits and DIY switches.

At the end, you will get the chance to design your own LED greeting card using this knowledge and your creativity! You can tinker with other circuit layouts and sketch whatever you like. Or, you can pick a template with choices including Star Wars, Marvel, cupcakes, and other random stuff.

No previous experience required!


Prerequisites
Bring a pencil

E717: Digital Logic and Circuit Building
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rebecca Czyrnik

Puzzle through circuit building challenges and learn how to breadboard at this introductory course. No math and no prerequisites, just hands-on learning.

E760: Running the Numbers: Scales in Biology
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Nicholas Nolan

This class seeks to give students intuition behind the rate at which molecular biology processes occur. We will begin by running some basic calculations, and build off of that to give a deeper insight as to how quickly biological processes happen.


Prerequisites
Some biology is useful; chemistry/calculus definitely help, but are by no means necessary.

E656: Engineering the Built Environment
Difficulty: **
Teachers: John Stuart, Brian Tam

When a civil engineer is asked "So what is it you even design?" the answer is often as simple as the wave of a hand. Most of the time with a quick look around you will find yourself surrounded on all sides by the product of civil engineering and its many sub-disciplines. With roles in structures, construction, transportation, energy, water, and environmental protection, civil engineers must master a multitude of concepts and problem solving styles to stitch our built environment together. From bridges & dams to tunnels & towers no project is too big to tackle.

This course will offer a broad overview of the inner workings of our built environment and it will provide an in-depth look at some of the most exciting challenges faced by today's civil engineers.


Prerequisites
High school physics

E631: Intro to Bioengineering
Difficulty: *

Bioengineering is a multidisciplinary field. In this course, we will discuss the different aspects of bioengineering, our personal experiences within this field, and its applications to other fields. We will also be doing fun activities that will be related to the different concentrations available here at UC Berkeley! No prerequisites are required. We would just like you to have an open mind and an interest in bioengineering.

E582: Spacecraft Structures

Learn about the basics of aerospace engineering, then put what you've learned to the test by building an engine mount structure for a rocket! Will your structure survive a launch to orbit?


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of forces

E687: Civil Engineering Basics
Difficulty: *

Ever look around and wonder how the buildings, roads, bridges, water systems, or cities in general came to be? Interested in civil engineering or curious as to what it even is? Come join us to learn the basics of one of humanity's oldest engineering disciplines! Afterwards, we will be doing an activity to put your newfound civil engineering skills to work.

E699: The Beauty of Calculus
Difficulty: **

This will be a class used to introduce basic principles of calculus and how they apply to various fields of science and engineering. It will mainly focus on theory and applications of calculus and include interactive experiments to demonstrate the usefulness of the subject.

E754: Start Your Engines: A Look Into The World Of The Automobile
Difficulty: **

This class will teach you a little bit about everything automotive! Car aficionado or not, come to this session for a brief history of the automobile, an in-depth explanation of how your car works, a look into the high octane world of motorsports, and a glimpse into the future of personal transportation. If nothing else, come to learn what to do next time you find yourself broken down, stuck on the side of the road... knowing your car can save you time and money! No prior experience required.

E694: Intuition in Robotic Design
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Wang

Interested in building robots? This class will provide a framework for transforming abstract ideas into robust machines! Additionally, we will go over a few real examples of robots in research and how engineers have solved challenging design issues.


Prerequisites
Algebra, Geometry, Physics


Humanities

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H698: Shifts in Marxist Thought
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sara Wexler

An examination of economic development beginning in the mid 19th century up until the present. Alongside these economic shifts, we study corresponding social revolutions; these revolutions, albeit different in aim and location, all relied heavily on Marxist thought.

H704: Classical Mythology
Difficulty: **

We will read and discuss a few famous myths from Antiquity -- and potentially their adaptations in modern day popular culture -- in order to give students a brief introduction to the field of Classics!

H666: How to Conquer France in 3 Easy Steps: Caesar in Gaul Through His Own Words
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexander Reed

In the year 58 BC, Julius Caesar embarked upon a series of campaigns that would ultimately last nearly a decade and would radically alter the cultural and political landscape of the ancient world. This course will explore the first year of Caesar's conquest of Gaul as related by the general himself in his Commentarii de Bello Gallico. We will examine the major events of the first book—such as the Battle of Bibracte and the mutiny at Vesontio—as well as Caesar's portrayal of himself, his allies, and the barbarian "other." No experience with ancient languages is necessary, only a desire to learn more about the world in which they were spoken.

H744: The Virtue of Robot Selfishness? Metaethics, the Orthogonality Thesis, and Rational Egoism
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Valerie Kendrick

This course will provide an introductory overview of the philosophical field known as metaethics. Unlike normative ethics, which deals with concrete questions such as whether it is ever okay to steal (more broadly, "what should I do?"), metaethics asks what it is that makes something good or bad in the first, "what is goodness?"

We will examine the debate between moral realism, which holds that there is an objective science of ethics that can be discovered in the same way as principles of chemistry or physics; and anti-realism, which holds that ethical propositions are ultimately either false or based on subjective (individual or cultural) standards.

This debate has taken on a new dimension in the domain of artificial intelligence. Many people advance what is called the "orthogonality thesis", which says that any ethical value or code can be combined with any level of intelligence. The archetypal example is the "paperclip maximizer": a superintelligent being that whose sole goal is to create as many paperclips as possible.

Is this view plausible, or would a being of sufficiently advanced intelligence see that there is something inherently wrong with such an impoverish goal and reject it?

We will then turn to the theory of rational egoism (also known as "enlightened self-interest") as an example of the naturalistic school of moral realism, briefly contrasting it with utilitarianism and intuitionism. We will consider whether the idea of free will can reconcile moral realism with the orthogonality thesis. We will also briefly touch on the connection of various ethical theories to various theories of personal identity.


Prerequisites
Students with no philosophic background will gain the fullest appreciation of the ideas in this course by taking it in combination with the courses on the philosophy of mind/personal identity and of free will, but it is not required.

H715: Middle Ground: Discussing Today's Most Controversial Issues
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ariel Chen

This course is also a decal here at Cal, inspired by the "Middle Ground" segment by Jubilee on YouTube. Middle Ground refers to an area of compromise between two extreme positions. Our mission is to foster peaceful conversation on controversial topics to create an understanding of differences whether or not "middle ground" has been reached.

H714: Free Will: What Is It? Do You Have it?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Valerie Kendrick

This course will offer an introduction to the issue of free will in philosophy. We will also consider its connection to questions of moral responsibility.

We will cover the main positions: hard determinism, compatibilism, and libertarianism.

Libertarians and hard determinists share the view that free will requires us to have genuine alternative possibilities of action that we choose between without being necessitated by prior events. Libertarians think that we have such possibilities (and therefore have free will). Hard determinists think that everything is necessitated, so we lack free will.

Compatibilists advance a different definition of free will, one in which freedom is compatible with the idea that all our choices might be caused by factors ultimately outside our control.

Is libertarianism compatible with science? Is compatibilism a tendentious word game? What is the connection of these theories to various religious doctrines? (Would it surprise you that the most influential Christian theologians have not been libertarians?) We will consider these questions and more.


Prerequisites
Students with no philosophic background will gain the fullest appreciation of the ideas in this course by taking it in combination with the courses on the philosophy of time and of mind/personal identity, but it is not required.

H700: Bear Closet
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Allison Rich

Bear Closet aims to create a platform for the LGBTQ+ community to share their personal narratives with middle school and high school students in the Berkeley area. We encourage members and supporters of LGBTQ+ community to serve as mentors and advocates for the equality of all identities by sharing their personal journey toward self-love and acceptance. We hope to inspire youth to take pride in their own identity and fight for a stronger, more inclusive future.

Bear Closet is for anyone interested in sharing queer-related stories/experiences (i.e. personal, of a friend/family member, etc) at middle and high school classrooms, in hopes of motivating out or closeted youth to pursue college education with the assurance of a better future.

H644: Chakra Healing
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Brenn Haydon

Learn about the function of chakras, or wheels of energy, within the human body. This course will discuss what chakras are and how to heal common injuries like the cold or a stomach ache with chakras. If you are interested in alternative or holistic healing techniques or wanting to awaken your inner spirituality and mindfulness this class is for you! Beyond lectures in this class we will be moving around. In this class we will also engage in beginner level yoga, so dress accordingly.

H724: Philosophy of Time and Time Travel
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Valerie Kendrick

All of you have surely seen stories involving time travel. What you may not realize is that many ancient myths, such as the story of Oedipus, raise exactly the same questions. An infallible "prophecy" is just informational time travel.

We will consider the paradoxes that arise from time travel and question whether it is logically possible.

On a deeper level, we will consider the two opposing basic views of the nature of time.

In one view, called presentism, time refers to an objective process of change. The past and future do not exist, so of course you cannot travel to them. Only the present exists.

In another view, called eternalism, time is just a subjective aspect of our experience. Just as there are three spatial dimensions, there is a fourth "time dimension", on which everything that has ever happened or will ever happen is laid out. This view potentially accommodates time travel.

We will touch on the scientific implications of each view, as well as their roots in the religious question of whether god could know people's actions in advance.


Prerequisites
Students with no philosophic background will gain the fullest appreciation of the ideas in this course by taking it in combination with the courses on the philosophy of free will and of mind/personal identity, but it is not required.

H685: Become an Italian
Difficulty: *

This will be an introduction to the Italian language, as well as Italian current events and culture. We will start from the basics so you do not need to know anything about Italy or Italian. Topics include: greetings, fun words, slang, regions of Italy, music, food, and more!

(there will be snacks!)

H677: The English Accent & Language
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Christopher George

A brief look into how the English language has come about and how it is spoken in the England today.

H725: Philosophical Zombies and the Ghost in the Machine: Philosophy of Mind
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Valerie Kendrick

What are you? Are you your body? Your brain? A computer program running on your brain's hardware? An immaterial soul?

This course will provide an introductory overview of the major questions in philosophy of mind: the mind-body problem and the nature of personal identity.

We will discuss the interactionist substance dualism of Descartes, which is likely the most similar to students' intuitive views. This theory holds that we are essentially immaterial minds or souls inhabiting physical bodies, and that the mind interacts with the body. But some have questioned how this theory fits with scientific evidence. Pejoratively, it has been called the theory of "the ghost in the machine".

We will then turn to the idea of epiphenomenalism, which holds that our mental activity is just a useless "byproduct" of the physical action of our bodies and has no causal influence on that action.

We will then turn to various materialist theories. We will briefly touch on eliminative materialism, which holds that the mind doesn't exist, then turn to the most popular functionalist view. Functionalism holds that the mind is akin to a computer program. We will discuss the idea of the philosophical zombie, used to critique this doctrine: a "zombie" acts just like one of us but lacks any subjective mental experience.

Are we essentially "ghosts in the machine"? Are "philosophical zombies" logically possible? What implications do these views have for the possibility of free will and ethics? We will consider these questions and more.


Prerequisites
Students with no philosophic background will gain the fullest appreciation of the ideas in this course by taking it in combination with the courses on the philosophy of time and of free will, but it is not required.

H651: Empathy through Specificity: Storytelling in Hip-Hop and Rap
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Dadmun

What connects Greek Tragedies, Star Wars, and Kanye West? How has modern society impacted the development of Hip-Hop? Can rap increase our capacity for empathy? We will answer these questions and more in an interactive exploration through the history, art, and nature of the biggest musical genre in the world. We will explore how rap can connect people, express joy and grief, and act as a catalyst for social change, and how the timeless art of storytelling is intertwined throughout it all.

At the end of this class, students will have a greater understanding of the historical and socio-political context of Hip-Hop, and how it fits into the broader human history of storytelling and empathetic connection.

H670: Shoes -- The White Man's Armor
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rohan Prasad

Shoes. On our feet.

We buy them no matter the price, we wear them no matter the weather... We love them no matter what. Is there a more sinister side to our footwear?

In this class, we will look at how shoes have to oppress and marginalize groups of people. This article of clothing, so ubiquitous in the West, is in fact a symbol of destruction. This destruction takes three forms -- colonialism, capitalism, and speciesism.

We will also how taking off your shoes -- joining the ranks of the shoeless, barefooted, and unshod -- can be a symbol of resistance. We will learn the history of unshod people around the world, and explore the importance of fighting against oppression.

Note: Students must remove all footwear during class-time.

H697: Fanfiction 101
Difficulty: *

From Dante's epic "Inferno" to the infamous "My Immortal," fanfiction is a unique and varied genre that has often been minimized, misunderstood, and maligned. Come learn about fanfiction through the ages, its ins and outs, and its impact on culture, society, and the content we consume. And of course, we'll start with the ABC's -- angst, bed-sharing, coffee shop AUs, and so much more.

H716: Middle Ground: Discussing Today's Most Controversial Issues
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrea Cadaing

This course is also a decal here at Cal, inspired by the “Middle Ground” segment by Jubilee on YouTube. Middle Ground refers to an area of compromise between two extreme positions. Our mission is to foster peaceful conversation on controversial topics to create an understanding of differences whether or not “middle ground” has been reached.

H759: Athens and the Persian Wars
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nicky Kianpoor

A brief overview of the causes, key battles, and consequences of the Persian War.


Prerequisites
None

H775: Should Socrates escape? An introduction to topics in moral philosophy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yi Qu

Summary:
Socrates was kept in prison for a month after his trial. Crito, his friend, came to convince him to escape into exile. It seems that everything had been well-arranged -- all Socrates needed to do was to decide. Now, should he decide to escape?

Together we will take a close look at some excerpts from Plato’s recount of the conversation between Socrates and Crito, especially the ones concerning Socrates’ insistence on “never do wrong” (49b-d) and his duty towards “the laws and the state” of Athens (50a-52d). We will then examine the application of these arguments in the contemporary context of war, racial justice, and revolution. Through this process, we will familiarize ourselves with some of the most burning issues in moral philosophy, in awe of the timelessness of these moral dilemmas.

Instructor’s note:
No prior experience in classics or philosophy is needed for this class. We will avoid using any academic jargons. The goal is to demystify both classics and philosophy using daily language and close-to-life examples.

If you would like to know more about the context before class, I recommend checking out this illustration: https://medium.com/bl%C3%A6khus-comics/the-crito-659a5b0717f0.


Math & Computer Science

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M771: Baseball Sabermetrics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Avery Perez

Learn about how to calculate and use different advanced stats in baseball, and how it can help predict future success, from wins above replacement (WAR) to fielding independent pitching (FIP).

M689: How to Lie With Statistics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kyle Kishimoto

Statistics are used in almost every aspect of our lives. From news outlets to politicians to corporations, groups with varying agendas use numbers to manipulate the way we think and act. Based on the book "How to Lie with Statistics" by Darrell Huff, this course provides a brief introduction to the ways that statistics can be used to mislead, and attempts to educate students on how they can see the truth behind all the numbers in their everyday lives.

M737: Introduction to Python Programming
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Diyah Mettupalli

Students will explore basic Python Programming Fundamentals.

This will include a brief run through of running programs using terminal.

This section will mostly be geared towards solving problems.

M652: Introduction to Data Science and Machine Learning in Python Full!

Today, one of the most sought-after skills is making sense of data! This workshop will introduce the basics of data science and machine learning with Python, equipping you with the tools to visualize, analyze and draw conclusions from data. Join us as we then apply these tools to build an optimal Pokemon team and predict the outcome of matches.

M636: I declare WAR! Fun with Baseball Analytics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kyle Kishimoto

Are you a baseball fan interested in the advanced statistics used by front offices and sports media that attempt to quantify every aspect of the game? Fun with Baseball Analytics will tell the century-old story of the numbers and ideas that have shaped professional baseball and the way it is played today, and discuss how modern technology is currently creating a new revolution in statistical tracking.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of baseball

M649: Multivariable Math: Graphs in 3 Dimensions
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Mark Aguila

In high school math courses the Cartesian plane is always the standard for graphs. Every graph is a curve on a flat plane. But what about graphs in 3 dimensions? This course will go into the basics of graphs in three variables. What do they look like? Take this class to find out.


Prerequisites
Algebra 2

M764: What is Quantum Computing?
Difficulty: ****
Teachers: Jordan Hines

Curious what the hype around quantum computing is all about? Want to know what quantum computing actually is? In this class, we'll discuss the key quantum mechanics that quantum computing is based on and how it differs from classical computing. Then, we'll see a few examples of simple quantum algorithms. Note that this isn't a class on how a quantum computer can physically be built. Instead, we'll be discussing the theory of quantum computing.


Prerequisites
Comfort with matrix multiplication

M646: Coloring Maps: An intro to graph theory
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mark Aguila

Look at a world map. Each country is a different color. Two countries next to each other are always different colors. What is the least amount of colors you need to color a world map so that no adjacent countries are the same color? Or any map?
Learn how this over 150 year old problem has interesting connections to math and graph theory.

M776: The Fourier Transform: an Idea That Changed the World
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Karthik Siva

If there is a single idea that permeates nearly every field of science and engineering but the name of which is unknown to most people, it is the Fourier transform. Although the basic idea is nearly 200 years old, it is so ubiquitous that scientists are still developing ever faster ways to perform the transform computationally. In this class, we will develop intuition for what the transform is, how it works, and what you can do with it. Some applications that may be covered (pending time and interest) include:

* Data compression
* Signal processing
* Music Theory
* Acoustic Engineering
* Electrical Engineering
* Quantum Mechanics

Come learn about (arguably) the most important mathematical tool in all of science! Emphasis will be on examples, visualizations, intuition, and applications rather than formal mathematics.


Prerequisites
Required: trigonometry; Suggested: calculus and/or linear algebra

M739: Introductory Programming
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tlaloc Barajas

I want to teach students the basic principles of programming by using a block based programming language called scratch. Its a simple language target toward students without much background of programming so this course would be perfect for all ages or levels of understanding. In the course we will program our own short video game.

M773: ax+by=1
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Liu

A long long time ago, I was taught something about this equation, and taught that it was very important, but I had no idea why. That is, until I took Math 55 at Berkeley. Now I know why and want to share with you the why! Honestly I just picked this topic at random because teaching is fun.

M696: Things I Wish My Calculus III Teacher Had Told Me
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Katherine Latimer

Many students of multivariable calculus feel justifiably overwhelmed by the panoply of theorems and formulae which are often bandied about in a seemingly disconnected fashion. I will attempt to provide a unified picture of this subject from the viewpoint of physics, where it arises naturally in the study of electromagnetism.


Prerequisites
One year of calculus, minimum. Some experience with multivariable calculus might be helpful, but no background knowledge on that subject will be assumed.

M772: LaTeX for Dummies
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bryan Ngo

Ever wondered where that "math look" comes from? Want to learn how to easily typeset equations like $$ e^{ i \theta} = \cos(\theta) + i \sin(\theta) $$? This class will teach the basics or typesetting with LaTeX using Overleaf. We will learn how to create a document, import packages, and some basic mathematical typesetting.

$$ \mathbb{THIS \ IS \ GONNA \ BE \ FUN} $$


Prerequisites
Laptop with internet connection

M587: The Diagonal Argument
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Gabriel Davis

One of the most famous proofs in the history of mathematics is Cantor's Diagonal Argument, which proves that there are different "sizes" of infinity. First published in 1891, it landed in the midst of fierce philosophical and mathematical debate about the true nature of infinity-- does it even make sense to talk about a "completed" infinity, treating it like a number? Or is infinity merely an abstraction-- the unquantifiable idea of endlessness?

Although Cantor was the subject of blistering criticism during his own time, today his ideas are relatively uncontroversial, and his set theory is foundational to modern mathematics. In this course, we'll learn the mathematical context needed to understand the Diagonal Argument, and discuss its role in the history of mathematics from the 19th century to the present day.


Prerequisites
None, but be ready to consider some relatively abstract mathematics.

M673: Exploring Data Science

Data science, a combination of statistics and computer science, is a rapidly expanding field and applicable to almost any subject. Learn how you can use numbers to figure out facts about the world, make predictions, and visualize trends. We aim to make this course accessible to all skill levels, regardless of past experience.

Based on UC Berkeley's fastest growing introductory class with over 1300 students this semester and taught by current course staff. (Please bring a laptop!)

M752: Make Your Own Website Workshop
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ani Gottiparthy

Making a website is a great way to get started with programming and make your mark on the internet.

Things you will do:
1. Learn the basics of HTML and CSS
2. Learn some best practices for web development
3. Get started making your own website


Prerequisites
A computer if you want to work along

M637: Learning about Python, the computing language not the snake
Difficulty: **

Ever heard of Python? Maybe java or html? These are all computing languages and are important in our future world! Here we will be going through the very basics of the language Python. This language is primarily used at UC Berkeley in many departments including: Data Science, Engineering, Computer Science, Cognitive Science, and so many more! Not only that, top companies like YouTube, DropBox, Google, Quora and even Netflix use Python. Believe it or not, Python is the second most used language in the world according to Github.

In this class we will go over basic Python Syntax, Error messages, Numbers and Arithmetic, Variables, Functions and Arrays.

For this course we will be using Jupiter Notebooks so please BRING YOUR LAPTOP!

Contact us if you have any questions or concerns!

Teachers
Shivani Patel - shivanijpatel@berkeley.edu
Sindhu Goli - sindhugoli@berkeley.edu


Prerequisites
Must have a laptop/tablet

M647: Ordinals and Hydras
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jordan Hines

What happens when you start counting and don't stop? Can a hydra be beaten? What do hydras even have to do with math? Come to this class to find out!

M648: Math in the Movies
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mark Aguila

Math shows up in movies and TV in a variety of contexts. It might be the math lesson the main character ignores or an insane problem a prodigy solves in seconds. This class will take a look at some math problems that appear in movies that sometimes go unnoticed. We'll look at examples like the math problem from well known movies like Good Will Hunting or Mean Girls.


Prerequisites
Algebra

M682: Introduction to VR
Difficulty: **

Curious about how VR devices like HTC Vive and Oculus Quest work? Want to create VR games and programs? Come to our Introduction to VR course to learn about all these and more!


Social Sciences

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O730: Health Policy & Advocacy 101
Difficulty: *

Class with the aim to teach students about different health policy topics and equip students with the tools for health advocacy.

O722: What is Corruption?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aidan Pearson

In the current era, a difficult question arises, what is corruption? Legalistic and moral views are possible. In this class, we will examine and discuss differing views on corruption.

Corruption is often used as a word to describe behavior that is perceived as immoral. We see it thrown out in the news by members of both parties regarding a variety of acts or behaviors that aren’t even technically illegal. Throughout history, various camps of ideology have been proposed for what the correct definition of corruption should be? In this class, we will consider if Machiavelli was right about Watergate and the different ways to define corruption. This class won’t teach the “best way” of understanding corruption, instead it will provide students with an opportunity to understand different frameworks of thinking.

This class is thanks in large part to Professor Raphael Murillo who is teaching History 103B –Corruption. The link to that class is here: https://classes.berkeley.edu/content/2019-fall-history-103b-001-sem-001

O590: Cal Marvel Cinematic Universe
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sanskriti Sinha

The objective of this course is to explore the world of Marvel through its cinematic universe. In this course, we will journey through the main set of Marvel movies, beginning from Iron Man (2008) and coming all the way to Avengers: Infinity War Pt.1 (2018). Through this journey, we will explore topics, themes and issues that are brought about in these movies. We will also try to explore what makes the franchise so compelling in terms of artistic innovation, character development, business models and marketing strategies. Students should be able to see the movies and point out the various social, ethical, political and economic themes that are highlighted within them. They should be able to critically analyze MCU’s presence and relevance in the modern world. The course is designed to focus more on how real-world themes and issues are portrayed in the movies. Students, will thus, be part of heated discussions regarding the same.


Prerequisites
Basic introduction to the Marvel Cinematic Universe

O660: Intro to Understanding Disability
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nathan Tilton

This course will be an brief introduction into understanding disability, ethnography, and disability centered design.

O650: Geography: More than "just maps!"
Difficulty: *

Have you ever had to name all U.S. state capitals for a geography class? Have you ever wondered if that's all geography really is? Well, it sure involves more than "just maps!" This class will go over three major areas of geographic study including: cultural geography, physical geography, and GIS/cartography. Come and learn about this truly interdisciplinary field that has something for everyone. *All levels welcome!

Our class site: https://maryantonia4.wixsite.com/mmorethanjustmaps

O709: Race: Its Historical Roots and Its Contemporary Relevance
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tommy Chung

Where does race come from? What does “race” even mean? Why is race a polarizing, often uncomfortable topic to talk about? How does race matter today? In this class, students will discuss and learn about the historical, contemporary, religious, biological, and political contexts of race. Hopefully, students will gain confidence in their understanding of race, be able to educate their peers about race, and get involved in the fight for racial justice.

Although the class will be an hour and 50 minutes, the class will incorporate fun icebreakers and breaks into the curriculum. Students are encouraged to take care of themselves so they can be engaged with learning -- stepping out to take a break at any time is totally okay! The instructor will prioritize accessibility and will cater to multiple learning styles. Fidget toys will also be available to help with learning!

O745: The Case for Capitalism
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Valerie Kendrick

You've probably heard many attacks on free-market capitalism. And likely you've heard misguided or even offensive defenses of various aspects of our existing mixed economy.

But what are the basic reasons that lead the vast majority of economists to favor a system primarily based on market exchange and private ownership of the means of production? What is so good about it?

This course will examine those questions and more. We will look at why both parties generally gain from trade, how competition among employers determines wages, how redistribution can be accomplished without regulation (the Nordic not-at-all socialist model), and how government can fix — but also create problems of "externalities".


Prerequisites
Casual familiarity with the very basics of economics will be helpful but is not required.

O684: An Insight into Medical Ethics Full!
Difficulty: **

In this course, we will be delving into common medical situations in where the right answer is not as clear as it seems. This course will get students thinking about about how there are many more factors to keep in mind rather than what's occurring strictly in the scientific realm. Come with an open mind and get ready to learn about medicine in a more thought-provoking way!

O736: Night at the (Anthropology) Museum
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rosie Macon

Discover what happens in museums when the gallery closes and the sun sets! Though it is not exactly how it’s depicted in the movie Night at the Museum, museum managers, assistants, curators, and collectors work behind-the-scenes to ensure the safety and quality of a museum. In this course, you will receive an introduction to museum studies, which includes: artifact curation and preservation, a brief history of museums, and the cultural implications of museums across different geographical regions.

On UC Berkeley’s campus, there are several museums, but only one related to anthropology. The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, located in Kroeber Hall, has over 3.8 million human-related objects. After discussing what anthropology is and how it intersects with museums, we will leave the classroom and take a gallery tour of the museum! Through this hybrid course, we will get the chance to learn and experience how anthropological museums function.

Note: Please bring your high school ID card for entrance to the Hearst Museum of Anthropology.

O686: Let's Talk About Mental Health
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kiara Monahan

Why is there so much stigma surrounding mental health? How prevalent are mental health issues? What can we do to destigmatize mental health? How can we take care of our mental health and support our friends?

We will have small-group discussions about all of the above topics in this course and encourage active participation. Everything will remain confidential and this is intended to be a supportive environment.

O735: Introduction to Building Wealth in the 21st Century
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mohit Sukhija

Have you ever wondered what millionaires do differently than the rest of us? Why is saving and investing in assets important? This class will be an introduction to the skills needed to start investing, create passive income, and become financially independent by managing personal finance. Additionally, different types of asset classes and their characteristics will be broken down.

O742: Let's Talk About Neuroscience!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sumati Wadhwa

Have you ever been curious about the aspects of the mind that comprise our very being? Let's take a dip into the fascinating, evolving realm that is Neuroscience. From exploring current developments in Artificial Intelligence to answering age old Philosophical inquiries, Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field with so many elements to delve into. So, join me on an interactive journey to further your knowledge and get you excited about this subject.

O584: Adulting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Belle Lau, Jenny Zhou

The school system does not require a class for students to learn how to live in the real world and function as an adult. We often enter college unprepared to take care of ourselves. Many life skills, including how to develop good habits, manage stress, pay taxes, budget our spending/income, and to live a healthy lifestyle, are necessary, especially when college is the bridge to adulthood. This course will explore the many dimensions of how to successfully adult.

O586: The American Math Education System: History and Controversy
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Gabriel Davis

While we sometimes think of math as objective, absolute, and above political controversy, the history of the American math education system is one of fierce, sometimes bitter conflict over fundamental beliefs and values. What kind of math should be taught? To whom? Should we emphasize the value of math for its own sake, or as a skill needed to prepare future engineers and accountants? Should math class be focused on drilling basic facts, or on building problem-solving skills? What about people who just hate math? Should they be required to take it? What should we make of the fact that nearly 70% of associate's degree students in the United States fail to graduate within 6 years-- largely because they can't pass college algebra?

This course will include 3 major components: a brief history of the American math education system and its attendant controversies, a summary of some of the major issues facing math educators today, and an interactive activity that attempts to answer the question "What do excellent math classes look like?" No prerequisites or required background other than an interest in the topic and a willingness to engage in discussion.

O662: Diversity in Media--Does It Matter?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Noah Rumbaoa

SJW? Social Justice Warrior? Star Trek? What's the connection? In this course, we will examine the history of the Star Trek franchise to see how the show has portrayed diversity in the 22nd, 23rd, and 24th centuries and find out why having diverse representation in our media is so important, especially in a time where some constantly claim that modern media is "SJW pandering." Students will experience a variety of different teaching styles, including lecture and discussion about media (clips from different episodes).

O669: A Psychological View on Buzzfeed Personality Tests
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Cantika Sasono

Even random personality tests on the internet have their roots in psychology! In this class, we'll take a close look at how psychologists assess personality and compare that to Buzzfeed personality tests. Additionally, we'll discuss important aspects of personality such as development, self-assessments, and definitions of various traits.


Prerequisites
An interest in Psychology

O632: Love and Self Sufficiency
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mirah Mirzazadeh

What does it mean to love? Do you appoint too much of your self-worth in the validation of others? Do you seclude yourself from others to keep your guard up? Most people feel inclined to align themselves with one of these binary trains of thought, but there's much more to love than a one-sided approach. With the help of poetry by modern-day poets and artists we will break down what it means to not only have healthy relationships with others, but also with one's self. Topics include but are not limited to: self-care/self-love, communication, and healthy boundaries. As an instructor, I acknowledge the influences of cultural, communal, and familial uniqueness and, while this course lays a framework for pondering such topics, I urges students to apply concepts in ways meaningful and relevant to their own lives and worlds; this is not a one-size-fits-all guide, but rather an outline for YOU to build upon for yourself.


Prerequisites
A commitment to self-reflection and personal growth.

O641: What is Anthropology?!
Difficulty: *

Like to people watch? Ever wonder *why* people do the things they do? Want to learn more about languages, cultures and societies? If you’ve got questions buzzing around your head, come check out this brief introduction to the field of anthropology!

O671: Introduction to Sociology
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Sarah Brand

Curious what Sociology is? This class will take you through various fields of Sociology including theory, education, religion, politics, race, gender, and more. Popular contemporary media will be used to portray sociological theories and concepts. Come to Introduction to Sociology to stimulate your mind and broaden your understanding of human interaction.

O679: A Critical Understanding of Public Health
Difficulty: **

This interactive and discussion-based course aims to introduce students to public health and how it impacts everyday lives. We’ll explore the different areas of public health and look at how medicine, the environment, and social-structural forces play a role in health. Learn how you can make a difference in public health!


Science

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S721: How Nucleic Acid Pucker Influenced the Development of Life Itself
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Kannon Pearson

To the casual eye, the structure of an RNA nucleotide doesn't look all that different from a DNA nucleotide. There's a ring, a phosphate group, and a base. But a closer inspection will reveal an important change: the presence of a single additional oxygen atom attached to the 2' RNA ring carbon. Come learn how this seemingly minor divergence impacts the structure of nucleic acid helices, DNA chemical stability, and -- just maybe -- the entire evolutionary history of all life on Earth!


Prerequisites
Some basic chemistry and biology knowledge (bonding, familiarity with DNA/RNA/proteins).

S753: The Opioid Crisis: How can YOU help?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Srija Manchkanti

The Opioid Crisis... you've seen it in the news, you've seen it on TV- not all of us are experts, but is there anything we can do to help?

Join us and learn the science behind opioids, naloxone, and how you can help someone who may be having an overdose.


Prerequisites
No prerequisites, but an understanding of basic brain biology and a willingness to help people will be helpful!

S719: Atomism: An Experimental and Philosophical History
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kannon Pearson

Nowadays, almost everyone knows about atoms. Those invisible, (kind of) indivisible little particles that make up the known universe. In this course we will trace the history of atomic theory, from its origins thousands of years ago in Greek and Indian philosophy to the powerful and elegant experiments that refined our atomic knowledge. You will learn fascinating history tidbits and will get to try your hand at interpreting the results of experiments that changed our very understanding of reality!

S667: Yoga, mantra, and meditation
Difficulty: *

Laughter yoga, meditation, and yoga for healthy eyes.


Prerequisites
NONE

S713: Brainstorm: Introduction to the Brain
Difficulty: **

Brainstorm is an interactive, hands-on approach to learning about the brain! We will learn about brain anatomy and function through creating miniature model brains. Then we will delve into more advanced topics about sensory perception and how the brain integrates sensory stimuli in higher thinking.

S746: Introduction to Your Immune System
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Isabella Lee-Rubio

Our immune system has evolved over millions of years to recognize pathogens and everyday invaders. It is a team effort involving many defenses. Each player has an important role. How do these defenses protect us against invaders we have never encountered before? How do we activate our system's powerful weapons? How do they orchestrate the immune response? Just as importantly, how do we prevent "collateral damage" and destroy cancer cells?

Here we will take a look at the game as a whole. Come learn about your immune system's important players like B cells, T cells, and antibodies, in addition to complex topics such as self-tolerance and cancer!

S690: Motion and Symmetry
Difficulty: *

Tackling the nature of motion itself with a succinct framework, classical dynamics is staple of high school physics classes around the world. Classical mechanics is as deterministic and fundamental as it is strange and intriguing, with a plethora of conservation laws setting the guardrails for the what things go where, when, and why. Join us as we dive deep into the foundations of classical dynamics, uncovering unintuitive yet elegant results illuminating the nature of symmetry and chaos.


Prerequisites
A spirit of curiosity

S702: Fun with DNA
Difficulty: **

What is DNA?Applications of DNA in daily life?
Lab Component:
DNA is there in foods you eat and also you have DNA. Using common home supplies you can extract your DNA and also DNA from foods.


Prerequisites
None

S727: Application of DNA technology in genomics and forensics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Meena Jain, Ram Kishore

Application of DNA technology includes techniques to improve, create, and manipulate genetic material. It also involves diagnosis of genetic disorders, manaufacture of Insulin, and in human identification.


Prerequisites
none

S766: Introduction to Physics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Adam Corbo

Introduction to several high end physics concepts with a particular interest in quantum computing and information.

S706: How to Talk About Climate Change
Difficulty: *

According to a 2018 report by researchers at the University of Michigan, about 6 in 10 Americans believe that global warming is taking place, and that it is caused by human activity. What should you do if you encounter one of those four who don't? In this session, we will discuss the most important takeaways from the current scientific consensus on climate change, as well as how to communicate effectively to a member of the non-scientific public.


Prerequisites
Some scientific background would be helpful, but not necessary..

S593: Introduction to Cardiology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Daniel Han

Wonderful opportunity to help advance science and to alert the public about the role of chronic marijuana smoking in vascular impairment. Recently, CDC advised limiting the use of e-cigarette over the uncertainty about its potential health impact. We are uncertain about the potential health impact of marijuana as well and this study could broaden out understanding about marijuana and its impact on us. Please follow the post below if you are interested in participating in this research!!!


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge about Biology; Some experience with Anatomy and Physiology preferred

S635: Laboratory Techniques: Separating Organic Compunds
Difficulty: **

Interested in Chemistry or Biology? Take this course for an introduction to some fundamental lab techniques used in organic chemistry labs. In this course, we will learn how to separate and purify different compounds found in drugs based on their chemical properties.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of high school chemistry would be helpful.

S763: The Search for Habitable Exoplanets
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Steven Giacalone

Just a few decades ago, the idea of there being planets around stars outside of our Solar System was the stuff of science fiction. But no more. In the last two decades, astrophysicist have discovered thousands of these extrasolar planets (or exoplanets, for short). A large part of this effort has been devoted to determining how many habitable planets - planets that humans, or some other form of life, can live on - exist in the Milky Way Galaxy. In this class, we'll talk about how astrophysicists find and characterize exoplanets. We'll begin by discussing the famous Drake equation, which can be used to estimate the number of active extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy, and how astrophysicists are working to solve it. We'll then discuss the science behind the different exoplanet detection techniques and how we use them to learn about what planets are made of. Last, we'll discuss how we gather information about exoplanet atmospheres and how that information is used to determine if a planet is habitable - or is already inhabited.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of introductory-level physics and astronomy would be helpful (i.e., Doppler effect; electromagnetic spectrum; Kepler's laws; difference between planets, stars, and galaxies).

S592: Stem Cells: Science and Society
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Masood Jan

Many believe that the cures to most diseases lie in stem cell science and research, yet others fear repercussions that could forever alter our social conscience and morality. This class takes students on a journey inside the stem cell revolution, where perspectives from scientists, researchers, policy-makers, and ethicists will challenge students to consider the societal, political, even spiritual implications of this rapidly developing frontier

S711: Microbes Make the World Go Round
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Maria Nguyen

Microbes are everywhere! They're even inside us. Due to their microscopic size, microbes have remained largely unseen. Join us while we explore the marvelous world of microbes that make the world go round.

S638: Fruits of the World
Difficulty: *
Teachers: William Albers

Do you like to eat fruit? Have you ever wondered why pears are so grainy? Or why apples come in so many different shapes and sizes? This class will answer any and all fruit-related questions you may have! The goal of the course is to leave you with a stronger biological understanding of fruit, botany and plant science.

S691: Goldilocks: A Story of a Million Atmospheres
Difficulty: *

Why can life on Earth persevere?

A planet's atmosphere acts like a blanket, protecting its delicate environment. It is also cause to some of the most beautiful, unexplained phenomena.

In this class, we cover a wide range of atmospheric topics from basic models and earth phenomena to why it rains helium in gas giants. Join us to learn how we can live in the atmospheres of different planets and how we explore alien atmospheres with the technologies we have today!


Prerequisites
An enthusiasm in physics, astronomy, or science is encouraged!

S675: 1:59 Autism Spectrum Disorder
Difficulty: **

1 in 59 children are diagnosed with Autism today and feel its effects through adulthood. This course is a basic introduction to the wide ranging issues regarding the Autism Spectrum Disorder. The class will discuss various topics including diagnosis, treatment, policy, and more.

S642: Climate Change in the Oceans
Difficulty: ***

Ocean Acidification, Cloral Bleaching, Sea Level Rise, Salinity and Thermohaline Apocalypse,
Runaway Feedback Loops and the sudden death of humanity. Is there any hope? Probably not. But the class will be fun.


Prerequisites
General knowledge of or interest in chemistry

S668: Phase Transitions and the Higgs Boson
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rahul Sahay

In primary school, we are taught that there are three phases of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. Fortunately for us, the universe is much more interesting than this! In this class, we learn how to define phases of matter by defining the means by which we transition between phases! Moreover, we see how phase transitions are everywhere in physics and lead to the existence of sounds waves and the Higgs Boson.


Prerequisites
Enthusiasm!

S758: Intro to Proteomics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lily Shang

Are you interested in learning about one of the most important components of life? Proteins are vital parts of a living organism. In this class, you will learn about the formation and structure of protein, 3-D visualization of proteins and methods of research in this field.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of biology or chemistry

S757: How to Time Travel
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kyler Natividad

Have you ever wanted to go back in time and kill your grandfather before your parents were conceived? I hope not, but if you have this is the course for you. Anyone else interested in physics or time travel is also welcome.
In this course I will discuss the physics of time travel from real experiments in time dilation to theoretical concepts like wormholes. This course will cover the basics ideas behind both special and general relativity, and the various ways in which these theories might enable or disallow time travel. I will also discuss what is possible to do with a relativity-consistent time machine, and how to resolve logical time travel issues such as the grandfather paradox.


Prerequisites
Helpful but not required: newton's laws of motion, simple vectors and geometry

S728: Quantum Reality
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Clay Halbert

A quick introduction to quantum weirdness and philosophers' and physicists' attempts to make sense of it. We'll be talking about Schrodinger's Cat, the double slit experiment, the history of quantum mechanics, and a summary of the interpretations of quantum mechanics.

If you've ever been interested in how things can be in two places at once, or how particles can tunnel through solid objects, or just curious about physics or philosophy at all, then come join us!

S756: It's Lit: Circuitry and Lightbulbs
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Savinnie Ho, Angela Wei

Come join us to learn how circuits function with traditional items, such as batteries and lightbulbs, and discover how abstract items, such as art and paper can also create circuits. This will be a fun, hands on tinkering introduction to electricity and physics through circuits!

S774: A first dive into special relativity
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Vyassa Baratham

Albert Einstein's theory of relativity is a bold and bizarre hypothesis about the way our universe works when things move very quickly. It predicts that objects shrink and expand and even age at different rates depending on how fast they're moving. And, as it turns out, these strange predictions are 100% correct!

While parts of the theory are complicated mathematically, its core physical ideas are straightforward to understand without any math. And there are mathematically simple applications of relativity which are nonetheless meaningful, counterintuitive, and inspiring.

In the course, we will briefly review the history of physics leading up to Einstein, then introduce the basic concepts that allow us to discuss special relativity (observers, relative motion, reference frames), present the postulates that special relativity is based on, develop some fundamental equations (time dilation, length contraction), and finally use this machinery to treat some problems of interest, hopefully including classics such as the "twin paradox" and how to fit a 1.0m pole into a 0.9m long barn.


Prerequisites
You need to have taken a physics class to get anything out of this one! Prereqs are: high school physics including basic trigonometry (sin/cos/tan) and algebra. I may use a tiny bit of calculus. If you know what a derivative is, you will be fine. If you don't, you will still be able to follow most of the talk with some minor difficulty.

S741: Cancer 101
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Samuel Mun

Once described as the “Emperor of all Maladies,” cancer kills over 20,000 people everyday worldwide. Despite the widespread impact of this disease, most people have little more than a basic idea of the workings of cancer. Did you know that cancer affects one in two men and one in three women in the United States? Or, that cases of skin cancer due to indoor tanning exceed cases of lung cancer due to smoking? Want to learn why taller women are more likely to get cancer? It’s about time that everyone knows a little something about cancer. If you are fascinated by this disease and want to learn the science behind it, enroll in Cancer 101!

S726: Special Relativity
Difficulty: ***

$$E = mc^2$$. Everyone knows Einstein's famous equation, but what does it really mean and where does it come from? This class will provide a brief introduction to the physics of near light speed reference frames. We will discuss how time can slow, and length can contract when one observer is moving near light speed, as well as the curiosities that arise from this including, but not limited to, Einstein's equation and paradoxes involving poles too big to fit in a barn and twins aging at different rates.


Prerequisites
A little bit of Trigonometry is helpful but not necessary.

S705: From the Big Bang to Black Holes: A Joyride through Spacetime
Difficulty: ***

What is cosmological inflation and why does anyone believe in it? How does inflation connect the quantum world to the macroscopic one, and how does that relate to the origin of objects such as galaxies, stars and black holes? How can we understand fundamental physics by looking at clues from our cosmological past, and what do these clues suggest for our future? Join us on a joyride through spacetime as we look to the cosmos for answers to some of the most mysterious questions about the universe!

S692: Physics in Music: Just intonation and Equal temperament
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Matthew Kim

Have you ever wondered why we use both sharp and flat when writing music? We can use only one of them and everything would work out nice and simple; We can just write Db as C#, and Ab as G#, right? Well, no. Because actually C# and Db are different notes, so we can not write Db as C#.
In this class, we will explore the physics and mathematics behind the music. We learn why Db and C# are different notes, what pure intonation is and how equal temperament made musicians’ life much easier. (well, sometimes)


Prerequisites
High School Physics recommended, not required. Experience in reading music recommended, not required

S701: MEDLIFE
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Laila Elias

This course is intended for people who are pre-health, or interested in global health. We will talk about the MEDLIFE mission and what it stands for (Medicine, Education, Development for Low Income Families Everywhere) as well as topics such as voluntourism, cultural sensitivity and sustainability.

S589: THE BRAIN ON DRUGS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Julia McCullough

Ever wondered what happens to the brain on drugs? Today we will be discussing the brain on opioids, lsd, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, alcohol, caffeine, and other drugs. The history of the drug, and short and long term effects will also be discussed!

S628: Zero Waste: Solutions for a Sustainable Future
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sage Lenier

Concerned about climate change? Not sure what to do about the plastic pollution crisis? This lecture will be an introduction to environmental education, focused on actionable solutions that you can implement in your own life and use to push for system change. We will also provide comprehensive resources for exploring a variety of environmental topics beyond this session.

S654: Introduction to Orthopedics

Every year, the field of orthopaedic research and surgery grows at the intersection of neuroscience, biomechanics, and bone health. With the expansion of the field, we wish to introduce students to orthopaedic science and help to spur their interests in orthopaedics.

S672: From Tiny Brains to Big Discoveries: Introduction to Drosophila Neuroscience
Difficulty: ***

Are you interested in understanding how your brain works? In this class we will explore several cutting-edge techniques used in neuroscience to explore how the brain works. At the end, you will get a chance to design your own experiment!

S681: Photosynthesis and Lasers
Difficulty: **

Photosynthesis provides all of the Earth’s oxygen, plays a pivotal role in the global climate, and serves as the energy source for essentially all living things on Earth. Specifically, it enables plants and other organisms to capture sunlight and convert it to usable chemical energy. In this course, we will first discuss the underlying principles behind photosynthesis with an emphasis on the structure of the photosynthetic apparatus. We will then examine the properties of light and the physical processes of absorption and fluorescence before learning how we can make use of specialized laser systems to study these processes in intact photosynthetic organisms.

S683: Stem Cell Research in Medicine
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lola Takhirov

This class is an introduction to stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine. We will be covering topics such as bone marrow transplants, vision restoration, and skin gun procedures. We will also discuss the future of stem cells in gene editing to cure diseases and even create designer babies.

S688: Urban Ecology and Evolution
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elisa Yang

Learn about how the urban landscape is changing the way organisms adapt and evolve! We will go on a short walk around the UC campus to find real-life examples of birds, plants, and other animals adjusting to the urban landscape, and discuss implications for conservation.

S703: 15 Pieces Of Indisputable Evidence that The Earth is Round
Difficulty: *

We are told growing up that the Earth is round, but how can we tell without relying on the word of "Deep State scientists"? The reputable news source Buzzfeed (https://www.buzzfeed.com/daves4/its-round) even provides a list of indisputable facts that prove that the earth is flat! But you, being a young and inquisitive scientist, will only trust your own eyes and observations. . . Join us and learn how you can prove to yourself that the Earth is round. Starting from everyday events such as the sunset and ending with discussions of General Relativity and Particle Physics, we will introduce 15 proofs that the Earth is round. This talk will touch upon aspects of astronomy, optics, differential geometry, subatomic particles, general relativity, and fundamental forces.


Prerequisites
While we will touch upon many different aspects of physics and math, no prior knowledge is necessary. Healthy skepticism is welcome!

S729: What would happen to a planet made entirely of fish?
Difficulty: **

What if you made a planet of fish? Can you cook an egg with the beam of the Large Hadron Collider? If you wore large enough shoes, could you use surface tension to walk on water? In the style of Randall Munroe's What If, we'll analyze absurd scenarios with real physics, reaching topics from general relativity to particle physics via questions a child might ask.

S734: The Wild and Wonderful World of Exoplanets
Difficulty: **

When you look up into the sky at night and see a star, it's likely that it has one or more planets in orbit around it, worlds far from our own. Like the planets Tatooine in Star Wars, or the waterworld Gargantua in Interstellar, planets orbiting around stars other than the Sun, or exoplanets, are fascinating to study and explore.

In this course, we will take a journey through some of the exoplanets that scientists have found. We will also explain how scientists discover these exoplanets, and how they learn a surprising amount about them, overcoming remarkable challenges to do so.

We'll even mention how students like yourself can join in this effort in high school!

S743: Is Everything Just a Wave?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Stephen Gant

An introduction to quantum mechanics and particle-wave duality.


Miscellaneous

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X591: Intro to Powerlifting
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Saahil Shangle

Interested in fitness and/or learning lifting technique? Powerlifting is a sport involving three main events: squat, bench, and deadlift. Sign up for this class to learn how to do each of these lifts!

X723: 2020 Democrats
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aidan Pearson

The current Democratic field has begun to solidify. We know for certain that Biden, Warren, Sanders, Harris, and Buttigieg have consistently stayed in the top of the polls. The question arises, who are these people? With a crowded field, many voters are overwhelmed by their choices offered this election cycle. We will examine how populism and impeachment has shaped the Democratic race. Additionally, students who will be 18 in the fall of 2020 will be shown how to register to vote.

X710: Learning how to Learn
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Aashna Desai

Have you ever tried learning something, but it just isn't going through your brain? Or have you ever spent hours trying to learn something, but it feels like it is useless?

The goal of this course is to uncover the necessary neurological tools and techniques that can help anyone learn better, avoid procrastination, manage their time and change their approach to learning.

X630: Why should I go to college?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bertha Avina

Trying to persuade students to apply to colleges.

X640: Cal Student Panel
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Chang

Ever wanted to know what being a Cal student is like? Now is your chance to know! You'll have an opportunity to ask students about their college experience, career paths, and more. The panelists will be students from various majors and departments eager to share advice with you!

X765: Get Better at Life!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: John Flores

Ever been alive before? Well then this is the course for you! Explore ideas on self improvement ranging from meditation, body posture, and mental models that'll help you take over the world.

X693: Yoga for beginners
Difficulty: *
Teachers: MANJU JAIN, ANIL SHARMA

Learn the basics and fundamentals of yoga.


Prerequisites
Anybody interested can join.

X634: Sustainable Buildings and Urbanism
Difficulty: **

More than 50% of the world now lives in cities, and we spend 90% of our lives indoors. With climate change already knocking on our door, it is integral for us to create sustainable solutions in our urban spaces. We need to start imagining the future we are pushing towards and asking questions about how we can achieve vibrant communities that are regenerative, economically-responsible, and socially-just: Who would our streets be built for? Where would our food be grown? What would we call “waste”?

This class will be a introduction from the DeCal course of the same name which also prepares students to take the LEED Green Associate Exam. We hope you will join us!

X768: Public Speaking: Thinking On Your Feet
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Yajushi Mattegunta

Want to learn how to become a better public speaker? This intro class will teach you what you need to know about vocal inflections, hand gestures, content, and more!


Prerequisites
None

X708: You CAN make a difference
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Gabriela Olmedo

Using the tenets of Effective Altruism, will talk about why we should do good, how we can do the most good based on evidence, and how we here in the first world have the ability to do a large amount of good.

X749: Putting Mountains on Paper: Intro to Contour Lines and Topographic Maps
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Brigitta Rehn

In this class we will look at topographic maps (those ones with all the squiggly lines) in order to learn how to read them to understand the form of the area represented. After learning the basics of reading the maps we will do a few activities to practice applying your new knowledge.

X718: Transferring From a Community College
Difficulty: *

Did you know that transfer students have a higher admissions rate to UC Berkeley than freshmen? Or that transferring can enable you to finish half of your bachelors for a fraction of the cost? Or that you can take your challenging lower division prerequisites in classes of 50 students instead of 500?

In this class we will discuss an alternative, nontraditional educational route: completing the first two years of your bachelors at a community college before transferring to a four-year university. We will discuss the social, financial, and educational benefits and drawbacks of this approach based on our own experiences as brothers who both transferred to UC Berkeley.

Please come with any and all questions you may have about community college, Berkeley, admissions applications, undergraduate research, and more!


Prerequisites
Curiosity!

X750: That zero-waste life: Reduce your waste and save the earth.
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Brigitta Rehn

In this class we will look at the surprisingly long history of low-waste lifestyles and discuss the many ways we can reduce the amount of waste we create. We will end the class by assembling our own reusable utensil/straw pouches!

X588: Thinking about College? What/ Why/ How/ When?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anna Judson

This course is designed to get high school students (grades 9-11) thinking about the process of applying to college universities.

With important dates and details given to students who may not have graduates in the family, this course is designed to empower low income and underrepresented students by walking through a step-by-step process of applying to college as a high school senior.

X707: Save a Life with Emergency First Aid
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Shloka Reddy

Have you ever wondered how to create a make-shift tourniquet? Are you interested in learning the signs and symptoms of shock? And how to give quality chest compressions? If so, this class is for you.

We will cover all the basic first-aid skills for common medical emergencies so that if you are ever in a worst-case scenario survival moment, you will be prepared rather than panicked! There will be some hands-on and interactive learning.


Prerequisites
Willingness and desire to help people!

X639: Meditation + Mindfulness = Ü Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Chang

Q: Why do meditation lovers enjoy going to airports?
A: Because they always get a free body scan

Meditation isn’t only about sitting cross-legged on the floor and humming to a deep tune. It comes in a plethora of forms: sitting in a chair eyes closed, breathing in a rhythm with eyes open, even standing while swinging your arms! Learn how to manage your daily stressors by welcoming the simple practice of meditation into your life.

✩ Bonus ✩
Class will also include various mindfulness tips :)

X678: Deception in the Workplace
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Todd Hirtler

Unfortunately, not everyone you come across in life has your best intentions at heart. We are often stuck working with people who are not only unfriendly, but actively try to undermine our efforts. People can use lies and deception to get what they want or to hurt those they don't like. In this class we will discuss how to protect ourselves from those who don't want us to succeed.

X645: How to Read Tarot Cards Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brenn Haydon

Reading tarot cards is an act of scrying, or forseeing, the future. This is a mindful practice in which one can receive guidance or direct answers to questions concerning all aspects of life.

As an instructor for this course, I have been practicing with tarot cards for 6 years and never have the cards been wrong in predicting my future!

In this course I will be introducing what tarot cards are, how to read and use tarot cards in your weekly routine, and celebrate the mysticism of life!

X658: Complex Meme Analysis
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Julia Miller

From SpongBob to Pikachu to Galaxy Brain, we will delve into the world of memes. These widespread internet ideas have evolved and compounded since their concept was proposed in 1993. With group activities in freehand meme making to interpretations of ambiguous ones, this course will increase your fluency in this new language.


Prerequisites
A general understanding of memes is recommended but not required

X747: Avengers Disassembled: Physics in Marvel Movies
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bhavish Dinakar

Why did Iron Man ask for the eigenvalue of a mobius strip when he solved time travel? How does Thor summon the Bifrost using an Einstein-Rosen Bridge? Does Spider-Man's web fluid formula really work?

We'll discuss the answers to these questions and more from a physics/math/chemistry perspective in our course. See you there!

X595: Football? Fútbol!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kadyn Kim

This is a course I started with Armaan Shah where we cover history of soccer, famous players, and soccer in popular culture.

X661: Public Speaking! What to Do and How to Do It
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Noah Rumbaoa

Public speaking is a highly valuable skill, not only for future employers, but for school, future relationships, and future involvement in your own community! In this course, you will learn different techniques to improve your public speaking and presentation skills, along with a little history about the Bay Area and modern regional issues (i.e. the housing crisis, transportation, climate change).

X665: Sustainability, Society, and Business
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Candice Lee

Climate change is real, and companies must look for smarter and greener alternatives to run their business models. In this interactive course, you'll learn about corporate social responsibility, the triple bottom line, and shared value creation. Finally, you'll get to team up with other students to pitch your sustainable business plan to the class!

X720: Experience Army ROTC
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jaeun Park

High school students will be exposed to the Army and ask questions of current Army ROTC cadets to see if the program might be right for them. High school students can also learn briefly about various topics such as Army tactics, drill & ceremony, and more.

X740: Intro to Bullet Journaling
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trinity Huynh

Do you like jotting, doodling, lettering, or just taking aesthetic notes? Or do you want to learn the basics of journaling and other lettering techniques? You will have the opportunity to learn these methods through this quick and easy class!


Prerequisites
None

X767: Poker: Texas Hold 'Em or Fold 'Em Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Bi

Learn how to play some poker! (the only real game in the casino) All skill levels welcome, ESPECIALLY beginners. We'll start off with some basics of how to play among your peers in the classroom. Then talk about poker probability and statistics, what your body language is giving off at the table, the psychology behind poker and gambling. Then play some more poker!

X769: Science, Religion, and Reasons for God
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amanda Xu, Charles Yang

In this course, we will be investigating the question of whether science and religion are compatible through four proposed models. We will also investigate various texts, authors, and worldviews to see if there are legitimate (scientific) reasons for God. Ranging from exploring the nature of man, the universe and Big Bang, the Bible, and more, this course's aim is to encourage student curiosity on important life questions, and to present a starting point to do so.


Prerequisites
willingness to investigate and engage with material!

X777: Is Anything Real?: Intro to Conspiracy Theories
Difficulty: *

Today, American pop culture is fueled by questioning truth. Heightened by the pervasiveness of the Internet, there is a public skepticism of reality as a concept, and as a whole. Behind every story lies an alternate view, and another perspective to life.

Come prepared to think philosophically about these alternate views and learn to question what you think might be fact with us!